Thursday, July 16, 2020

7 Mistakes to Avoid When Emailing Professors

7 Mistakes to Avoid When Emailing Professors Much changes when you begin collegeâ€"new friendships, a new living space, and new knowledge that will propel you into the career of your dreams. Among these changes, youll need to learn how to communicate effectively with your professors and its surprising how many university students dont know how to do this properly.Perhaps youve never needed to communicate much with your teachers throughout high school. Or perhaps your university experience includes a change in culture as well, as you study in America after spending significant time in another country. In both cases, understanding the proper way to email your university professor will help you have success in your academic experience, regardless of the obstacles you face.So, what should you avoid when emailing your professor? Read below to find out the top seven mistakes that most people make when communicating with their higher-ed teachers. Avoid these mistakes and youll be well on your way to successful communication and (hopef ully) a well-earned college degree.Mistake #1: Being wordyProfessors are busy people. In between a certain number of classes that theyre required to teach, they must grade papers (sometimes hundreds per assignment), prepare lesson plans, and conduct research/write papers that are required by the university in order to keep their post. In addition to this, they have hundreds of other students besides you to teach. Somewhere in the middle of all of that, they have personal lives.Often, students forget that all of these other things are happening in a professors life when they email him or her. The result is long emails, full of unnecessary details or extended requests, assuming that the professor has all the time in the world to read them.When you email your professor, the best way to avoid this mistake is to imagine that every one of your fellow students in the class (sometimes this can be hundreds) is also sending an email. When you imagine this to be happeningâ€"and lets face it, i t could very well be happeningâ€"youll keep your communication succinct, only when necessary, and to-the-point.This includes a subject line that is easy to organize based on the student (you) and the class. For example, if your email concerns a report in your American History class, your subject line might read: Question regarding report â€" American History 101 â€" [Your name]. This will help your professor sift through emails to determine which need attention first based on the purpose of the email.Mistake #2: Asking questions with answers that can be found elsewhereAs mentioned previously, professors are busyâ€"sometimes extremely busy. This means that if you are emailing to ask a question with an answer that could be found elsewhere, youre wasting your professors time. And weve already established that extra time is not a commodity most professors have.So how do you avoid this common mistake? First, before you send an email asking a question, read through the syllabus and class webpage (if there is one) to see if you can find the answer to your question there first. Second, if neither of these resources provides the answer you seek, contact a fellow student in the class to see if they know the answer. Its always a good idea to get the contact information of other students in your class for this exact reason, especially if you are working in groups or on group assignments. Third, ask yourself if the question must be answered immediately, or if it can wait until the next time the class meets.If neither of these options provides answers for your question, or if your question cant wait for the next time youre in class, then (and only then) is it acceptable to email your professor to ask. Remember: keep it short and to the point when you do. And make sure the subject line offers your professor a good idea of the topic of your email.Keep your email communication with professors short and succinct, showing that you value their time. Photo by Tra Nguyen on Unsplas hMistake #3: Being informalRegardless of how informal or easy-going your professor seems when teaching the class, never make the mistake of being informal in your email when communicating with him or her. This can be taken as a sign of disrespect and includes emails written to graduate assistants who might be helping your professor with the class projects, grading, and instruction procedures. The simple fact that they are teaching you and providing you with needed knowledge to pursue your life goals means they a) know more than you about the topic and b) should be granted respect.In many cultures, speaking informally to a teacher is considered highly disrespectful. Some even insist that a student should not look a teacher directly in the eye or address him or her in a demanding tone. While Americans arent as formal as many other cultures, it is still a sign of disrespect to address your professor by his or her first name (unless youre asked to do so) or make demands as if you were a peer. Your professor has a degree that you do not have (yet) and is imparting his or her wisdom to you so that you might earn your degree. For this simple reason, being informal is a sign of disrespect, and should never happenâ€"in an email or otherwise.Mistake #4: Telling your life storyAs an editor, I have copyedited literally hundreds of emails that students have sent to me before sending it to their professor. In the process of doing so, I have run across emails that are pages long, detailing specific reasons why the student missed class, made a bad grade or needs to withdraw. In each of those situations, I made the same recommendation that I make here: Dont. Just…dont.If you have a unique life situation that compels you to miss multiple classes, fail tests, or miss assignments, an email is not the proper method to use to discuss this with your professor. Rather, you should request time to meet with him or her and discuss your personal situation in personâ€"whether after clas s or during conference hours (which all professors will have posted and usually include on their syllabus).Obviously, there will be life situations that arise that bring challenges to your academic pursuits. You cant control these. Professors understand this and for the most part, are willing to work with you to resolve them while still allowing you to pass the course. However, since youll need to provide specific details, and since emails should never be overly wordy, dont use emails to communicate your need. If the situation is personal enough to request extended time to turn in assignments or excused absences, it is personal enough to discuss face-to-face with your professor.Mistake #5: Demanding grade changes or unique privilegesThis mistake goes along with mistakes #3 and #4. When you demand grade changes or unique privileges (such as freedom to miss class while others are penalized for it), you run the risks of informality and providing details in an email that should be discu ssed face-to-face. If the situation is important enough for you to request special privileges that other students dont get, then it is important enough for a private conversation with your teacher.Rememberâ€"a professor is not required to grant leniency to you based on your life situation or the challenges you run into that keep you from attending class and making passing grades. There are no rules at the university level that require faculty to make these exceptions for students. It is strictly granted on a case-by-case basis and at the professors discretion. In such, these are requests that you should ask for humbly and without expectation or assumption of privilege. In either case, neither request belongs in an email.Any situation that requires detailed explanation should be reserved for a face-to-face conversation with your professor. Photo by Charles ???? on UnsplashMistake #6: Grammar/spelling errorsWhen I mentioned previously that Ive copyedited many emails to professors, its because students understand that an email sent with excessive grammar or spelling errors will not be taken seriously. This is why if English is not your original languageâ€"or even if it is and youre not the best at communicating or spelling things correctlyâ€"get an editor.Even if you consider yourself to have excellent English writing skills, its still important to copyedit your email before sending it, as an additional precaution. If you cant hire a proofreader or copyeditor to do this for you, at least use the grammar tools available in many word processing programs or online.Mistake #7: Emoticons and all capsFinally, lets look at mistake #7, which is connected with the mistake of informality. Never use emoticons in an email to your professor, as these are considered to be informal communication. Even though many young adults use emoticons often due to smartphone technology and social media prevalence, they have no place in formal communication with your teacher.Additionally, u sing all caps is considered to be rude. It is the same as yelling at someone, except youre doing it in writing instead of in speech. While many people assume that all caps is a way to highlight words or a point, this is a false assumption. If you want to highlight a word or a point, use bold font or italic font. You can also use an exclamation point, although be careful of this, as excessive exclamation point usage is considered to be poor grammar (and poor taste). Whatever you do, avoid using all caps at all costs.

Thursday, May 21, 2020

Finnie Walsh - 825 Words

Finnie Walsh Essay By: Sierra Millns Many people say that you must have plenty in common with someone in order to be their best friend. However, in the novel Finnie Walsh by Steven Galloway, this is not the case. Finnie and Paul have a few things in common, such as their passion for hockey, but they were (for the most part) complete opposites. Pauls family has a struggle with money throughout the duration of the novel, while Finnies family is quite wealthy. After Mr.Woodwards accident, Finnie is struggling to escape the guilt; meanwhile, Paul is able to let it go. Finnie is a risk taker along with being very outgoing; but on the contrary, Paul is very timid and takes everything in stride. Paul and Finnie have few things in common;†¦show more content†¦As much as Paul loves hockey, he does not let it consume his life. Paul is more understanding than Finnie about the accident, and does not allow it to affect him for the rest of his life. Although Paul does not allow the accident to take over his life, he does ch ange because of it. The accident leaves Paul to be a lot more cautious and more worry-some. Despite his cautious personality, he finds himself trying new things and taking risks because of Finnie. ...Without Finnie Walsh, IShow MoreRelatedLeadership Of The Harvard Business School Essay1838 Words   |  8 Pages(Alimo-Metcalfe and Alban- Metcalfe,2005; Bass,1990). 4. Education is vital for developing leadership amongst GDPs (Morison and McMullan, 2013). 5. The LEAD program helps GDPs to practice and refine leadership skills reflective in their practice (J. Walsh et al, 2014). References: 1. Capowski, G. (1994). Anatomy of a leader: Where are the leaders of tomorrow? (cover story). Management Review, 83(3), 10. 2. Grout, Jeff; Fisher, Liz (2010). What Do Leaders Really Do: Getting under the skin of what makes

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Racism And The Civil Rights Movement - 2014 Words

Throughout the world, everyone makes remarks that may offend one’s character or race to distinguish him or her as inferior. Racism is a prominent epidemic that has especially affected African Americans in the development of America. Africans were torn away from their homes and brought to America in the 17th century to work as slaves, where they experienced various forms of chastisements and torture. Then in 1860, Abraham Lincoln was elected president where he expressed his strong disposition against slavery, which then began the Civil War in America. Lincoln abolished slavery in 1863 in the Emancipation Proclamation, freeing all the slaves. However, many of the freed slaves still lived in bad conditions and poverty. Whites saw African Americans as an inferior raced, and they discriminated against them, as they were not allowed to attend the same school or church as they did. In the 1950s, the Civil Rights movement grew as black activists made ground-breaking stands for their c ommunity including Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King Jr. Congress passed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 which banned discrimination in schools, jobs, or any public places. Despite these progressions throughout the years, about 25% of African Americans in the USA still live in poverty having a lower income and a higher unemployment rate than whites. Much of this inequality is due to the media’s portrayal of blacks in the community. The media uses negative stereotypes to depict untruthful and unpleasantShow MoreRelatedRacism, Racism And The Civil Rights Movement1009 Words   |  5 PagesRacism is Evident in American Society Today The history of the United States in regard to racism and discrimination is no secret. Children are taught about segregation, slavery, and the Civil Rights Movement like the events were purely in the past. 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Book Review To Room Nineteen Free Essays

In this way, Suntan’s high and low points are drastically influenced by her social and physical situations. Suntan’s life Is sprinkled with a series of high points all centered on her level of independence at that particular time. For example, her happiest moments In life transpire when she leads a semi-separate life from Mathew, she has a separate Job, friends, and apartment; her social and physical situations overlapped but were not dependent on Mathews at this time. We will write a custom essay sample on Book Review: To Room Nineteen or any similar topic only for you Order Now Suntan’s next moment of relief ensues when she comes across Mrs.. Downtrend’s motel, although the room itself was, â€Å"ordinary and anonymous† (Leasing 878) it’s the social environment here that Susan craves; feeling detached from herself and almost reinvented gives her the temporary relief she needs to go home and be content with her life with Mathew and the children. Like a drug addict looking for her next fix Mrs.. Downtrend’s motel will no longer feed Suntan’s crave for solitude anymore, so she instead looks for a new relief and finds it in Fried’s motel. Fried’s motel is frequented by hookers and is a much worse establishment Han Mrs.. Downtrend’s, but here Fred lets her be and gives her the feeling that, â€Å"she was alone and no one knew where she was† (Leasing 883), which satisfies the social privacy she desires. Suntan’s final moment of relief occurs when she decides to take her life away In Freed motel; In this way she leaves the world content with the relationships she’s left behind including her husband and children, while ultimately entering a permanently new social and physical environment giving her the fresh start she was looking for. Although Susan had many high points that were influenced by her social and physical environments she also had many low moments that were influenced by the same factors. Susan experienced many low moments; all of these unfortunate events were in some way influenced by her social and physical environments at that time. The first low point Susan faces occurs after she becomes Mrs.. Railings and they start a family. After having children Susan quits her Job and transitions into becoming fully dependent on Mathew, this change In social and physical atmosphere coupled with Mathews Infidelity causes the first crack In Suntan’s character. Subsequently, years later Suntan’s next low experience occurs when the twins go to school, instead of on her, this change in the social situation drives her to a new low mood. The next low point strikes when Susan finds out that Mathew knows about Fried’s Motel, as it is no longer hers, â€Å"The peace in the room had gone. She was constantly trying to revive it, trying to let go into the dark creative trance (or whatever it was) that she found here. (Leasing 886); her last area of peace has been found causing the final break in her character. In conclusion, Susan Railings death can be seen as the fate of a women who couldn’t handle the life of a housewife and loses her sense of self only to find it in death, which acts as the ultimate change of social and physical environment. To conclude with a quick recap, â€Å"To Room Nineteen† by Doris Leasing is a story of the events leading to a woman’s death due to post marital depression. How to cite Book Review: To Room Nineteen, Papers

Saturday, April 25, 2020

Thinking Inside the Box free essay sample

Think about what you’re surrounded by. Automatically you would think about all the positive influences in your life, right? Now think about everywhere that you’ve been today. How many of those places have been shaped- ever so originally, like a box? Where the concrete walls are flat; the floor, is flat; and the door is a square. The same door that you walk into and even the windows are square! Where have you seen this place? Have you been here before? Is it: your room, bathroom, kitchen, garage, or possibly your basement? Or is it any place else that you have been? It’s funny how the world works this way. It’s funny how your main goal as a child was to think outside of the box, but your main conclusion on how a house or a home should look when drawn, was a box. And the perfect family of four was supposed to live in this box. We will write a custom essay sample on Thinking Inside the Box or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page Their life was literally drawn: boxed in. Many of us may actually have a family of four. Let me show you how you probably lived. Your mom and dad live in a box. They shared a perfectly symmetrical square bed, and a rectangular counter of two sinks. They had had square side tables and a dresser. The wooden floorboards that creaked, were also rectangular. Now for easier representation, let’s just say that both of your parents have similar jobs to each other. Each morning, they’d get up, and hit the snooze button on their rounded rectangular alarm clock. They’d pull out their drawers and pull out their squarely-folded, collared shirt, or walk open their long closet door to reveal a walk in box to get their crisply ironed button-down from a wire hanger. They’d get their pretentiously pleated pants and a matching belt with a small silver buckle. They’d wait their turn at a five minute shower and make their separate daily plans as they stand in a box that pours hot water on their heads. After preparing themselves for long day at work, they would dry off and dress themselves, leaving two more things to do before they leave their home box for the day. Both carefully trying not to make the stairs creak and to wake you up, they’d pour their Raisin Bran or other flakey cereal from a cardboard box and eat it before it becomes soggy in their 2% fat, pasteurized milk. When all finished, with their milky breakfast still hanging on their upper lip, they grab their favorite mug that reminds them how good of a parent they are, or how accomplished they are at their job, or something, and pour themselves a cold glass of coffee that was made the night before only to heat it up for 30 seconds in the boxy microwave. Grabbing their keys and phone in the same fumbling motion off the front table in the downstairs hallway, with giving them just enough time to slip on their oxfords and go to their station wagon, or modernly fashioned Prius, push the unlock button on the control, stick the keys in the ignition, and go. Wiping away the bead of sweat that rolls down on the side of their head, they open their personal mirror from the sunshield, look themselves in the eyes and try to motivate themselves to hard day at work with annoying people they don’t want to talk to and their cocky boss that picks on them a majority of the time. Just listening to jokes that aren’t funny, and taking calls from employees down the hall who are so frustrating only because they are old and refuse to follow the modern technology movement. When satisfied, and fully motivated, they tune into their favorite news station and listen to poetry and interviews and politics, thinking that maybe knowing something thatà ¢â‚¬â„¢s going on in the rest of the world might help them at their box-office job. Small rings of exhaustion lingering beneath their eyes and sipping their slowly cooling coffee, they begin their drive to work. Slipping out of the driveway and out of their suburban neighborhood, they run past a stop sign and widely turn onto the highway to face the morning dose of traffic that waits for them to slam their breaks just as hard as the first car that flipped over on their way to work. Releasing a sigh of exhaustion mixed with frustration, your parent will honk their horn and flip people off as the traffic will gradually become heavier and seem to move slower especially as the caffeine from their morning coffee begins to seep in. Their impatience causes the start of the chain of stress for the day. It has been almost an hour in traffic, and the news channel has turned into static and elevator music. The rectangular clock reads 6:52 with the repeating digital message on what radio station is on. With the want to listen to world news and politics, the choice has been made for them. Changing to a comedy talk show with an almost silent interference of a radio broadcasted televangelist station buzzing in the background. Hopeful to find a clearer station, they zoom through multiple stations to find the right one. Maybe this time they’ll break a chuckle through their tight lips. No channel found yet, they soon turn grateful as traffic starts moving along. It is now 7:22, and realizing now that the traffic is moving comes another reaction of sadness. The corners of their eyes dropping lower, their determination flickers and their face of seriousness is on. They don’t want to work here. This was not in their plans of where they wanted to work when they were older after receiving their degree in journalism or their bachelors in health science with a Ph.D. in biology. No, this was not even their backup plan. They are working in a grey building with grey wrinkled faces to receive their fat checks. Their well-deserved rectangular compounded sheets of cotton and paper dyed green and faded after they have been worn down and used by the people that once thought that they deserved that same sheet of money too. Driving into the parking lot of work now, they grab their blazers, dump their coffee, tuck their phone in their pockets, clip their I.D. on their blazer pocket, and lock the car door behind them. Taking a deep breath in, they show the security guard their I.D. as their welcomed by the automatic, tinted sliding glass door with security cameras on each side. Walking past the fountain in the lobby, they run to take the last available space in the elevator. Standing uncomfortably close to people whom they don’t even know, not making eye contact, and not a noise made by anyone except for the chiming for the bell in the elevator every time a floor is passed. When the doors finally open, everybody passes around the people that are left and head their separate ways to finish the work that has been assigned to their cube-farm. Still in the elevator that gets filled up at every stop, they find their destination and get off. Thankful not to be in that claustrophobic box anymore. Brushin g off whatever lint has been rubbed on them, they turn around to be welcomed by their boss reprimanding them for being late and handing over a pile of work that they have no idea what they’re for or about. Probably just filling out tables and graphing data that the production workers on the other floors have found and need to send out to the allied companies that are corresponding to ours in a different language. Headed toward their cubicle, they look at their graduation photos that are on the bulletin board next to the computer and remembering what they thought life would be like before they retired. Never in a million years did they think that they’d be working for a company they never knew existed and only took the job because their apartment roommate said that they assign really cool projects. But that was when they were 20-something, and the roommate just so happened to be a more successful person than they were, even if they were both the same age.

Wednesday, March 18, 2020

Free Essays on Adolescents

ADOLESCENT DECISION MAKING: IMPLICATIONS FOR PREVENTION PROGRAMS MEDIA INFLUENCES The media - television, radio, movies, music videos - are part of the social environment in which today's young people grow up, and they can contribute to setting social norms. Presenter Sarah Brown, director of the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, pointed out that young teenagers spend up to seven hours a day watching television and that older teenagers may spend more than seven hours a day listening to the radio and CDs or watching music videos. There is a tremendous amount of sexual innuendo and sexual activity portrayed in the media, and most of that sexual activity is between unmarried people, according to Brown. In her research, presenter Monique Ward, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Michigan, found that 29 percent of interactions between television characters is sexual in nature (Ward, 1995). She pointed out that drinking permeates television, with 70 percent of prime time network shows portraying at least one instance of alcohol consum ption. There is also some indication that the portrayal of cigarette smoking is on the increase both in movies and on television (Klein et al., 1993; Terre et al., 1991). Little research has been done to document the effect of media portrayals of sexual behavior or alcohol, tobacco, and drug use on the behavior of teenagers. Ward has found some evidence that the media may influence social norms. Her research found that young adults who watch television shows with high sexual content, such as nighttime soap operas and music videos, tend to have more liberal sexual attitudes and to believe their peers are more sexually active than do those who do not watch such shows. Advertisers spend millions of dollars trying to influence product purchases. A number of studies have shown that tobacco advertising and promotional activities may encourage young people to begin and t... Free Essays on Adolescents Free Essays on Adolescents ADOLESCENT DECISION MAKING: IMPLICATIONS FOR PREVENTION PROGRAMS MEDIA INFLUENCES The media - television, radio, movies, music videos - are part of the social environment in which today's young people grow up, and they can contribute to setting social norms. Presenter Sarah Brown, director of the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, pointed out that young teenagers spend up to seven hours a day watching television and that older teenagers may spend more than seven hours a day listening to the radio and CDs or watching music videos. There is a tremendous amount of sexual innuendo and sexual activity portrayed in the media, and most of that sexual activity is between unmarried people, according to Brown. In her research, presenter Monique Ward, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Michigan, found that 29 percent of interactions between television characters is sexual in nature (Ward, 1995). She pointed out that drinking permeates television, with 70 percent of prime time network shows portraying at least one instance of alcohol consum ption. There is also some indication that the portrayal of cigarette smoking is on the increase both in movies and on television (Klein et al., 1993; Terre et al., 1991). Little research has been done to document the effect of media portrayals of sexual behavior or alcohol, tobacco, and drug use on the behavior of teenagers. Ward has found some evidence that the media may influence social norms. Her research found that young adults who watch television shows with high sexual content, such as nighttime soap operas and music videos, tend to have more liberal sexual attitudes and to believe their peers are more sexually active than do those who do not watch such shows. Advertisers spend millions of dollars trying to influence product purchases. A number of studies have shown that tobacco advertising and promotional activities may encourage young people to begin and t...

Sunday, March 1, 2020

Flora and Ulysses by Kate DiCamillo Book Review

Flora and Ulysses by Kate DiCamillo Book Review Flora Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures would simply be the poignant story of a lonely and cynical 10-year old named Flora if it werent so funny. After all, how sad can it be when one of the main characters is a squirrel who becomes a poet after the life-changing experience of being sucked up by a giant vacuum cleaner and rescued by Flora who names him Ulysses. The more serious story of how Flora learns to cope with her parents divorce and her relationship with her mother, makes a friend, and begins to exchange hope for cynicism is brilliantly woven into the adventures of Flora and Ulysses. Summary of the Story It all starts when the next-door neighbor, Mrs. Twickham, receives a new vacuum cleaner that is so powerful that it sucks up everything in sight, indoors and out, including a squirrel, which is how Flora comes to meet Ulysses.  Getting sucked into a giant vacuum cleaner turns Ulysses into a  superhero with great strength and the ability to learn to type and write poems. As Flora Belle would say, Holy bagumba!  While Flora is thrilled with Ulysses, her mother is not and conflict ensues. As the story unfolds with the illuminated adventures of Flora and Ulysses, the reader learns that Flora is a very cynical child who expects the worst at all times. Now that her parents are divorced and she is living with her mother, Flora misses having her father around all the time. Flora and her father understand one another and share a great love for the comic book series The Illuminated Adventures of the Amazing Incandesto!, which her mother hates. Flora and her mother do not get along well. Floras mother is a romance writer, always busy trying to meet deadlines, writing what Flora calls treacle. Flora is lonely she feels abandoned by her mother and unsure of her love. It takes a master storyteller to weave the wacky story of a squirrel with superpowers with a poignant coming-of-age story, but Kate DiCamillo is up to the task. In addition to the imaginative story, the reader benefits from Kate DiCamillos love of words. Children tend to be intrigued by interesting new words and DiCamillo has a lot to share, including: â€Å"hallucination,† â€Å"malfeasance,† â€Å"unanticipated† and â€Å"mundane.† Given the story and the quality of the writing, its not surprising that DiCamillo won her second Newbery Medal for young peoples literature for Flora Ulysses. An Unusual Format While in a lot of ways the format of Flora Ulysses is like many other illustrated middle-grade novels, there are some notable exceptions.  In addition to the black and white one-page illustrations that are interspersed throughout the book, there are brief segments in which the story is told in comic-book format, with panels of sequential art and voice bubbles. For example, the book opens with a four-page comic-book style section, which introduces the vacuum cleaner and its incredible sucking power.  In addition, throughout the 231-page book, with its very short chapters (there are 68), a variety of bold typefaces are used for emphasis. A recurring phrase, in bold caps, is one Flora has adopted from her favorite comic: TERRIBLE THINGS CAN HAPPEN. Awards and Accolades 2014 Newbery MedalParents Choice Awards Gold AwardPublishers Weekly Best Books of 2013 Author Kate DiCamillo Kate DiCamillos has had a successful career since her first two middle-grade novels, Because of Winn-Dixie, a Newbery Honor Book, and The Tiger Rising. DiCamillo has gone on to write more award-winning books, including The Tale of Despereaux, for which she won the 2004 John Newbery Medal. All About Illustrator K.G. Campbell Although he was born in Kenya, K.G. Campbell was raised  in Scotland.  He was also educated there, earning a Master’s degree in Art History from the University of Edinburgh. Campbell now lives in California where he is both an author and an illustrator.  In addition to Flora and Ulysses, his books include Tea Party Rules by Amy Dyckman and Lesters Dreadful Sweaters, which he both wrote and illustrated and for which he received an Ezra Jack Keats New Illustrator Honor and a Golden Kite Award. In reference to illustrating Flora Ulysses, Campbell said, â€Å"This has been an expansive and joyful experience. What wonderfully oddball and charismatic characters people this story. It was a thrilling challenge to bring them to life.† Related Resources and  Recommendation There are additional resources on the Candlewick Press website where you can download the Flora and Ulysses Teacher’s Guide and the Flora and Ulysses Discussion Guide. Flora Ulysses is one of those books that will appeal to 8 to 12-year-olds on multiple levels: as a wacky story filled with eccentric characters, as a coming-of-age story, as an engaging story with an intriguing format, as a story about loss, hope and finding home. As Flora copes with the changes the squirrel brings to her life, she also finds her place in her family, realizes how much her mother loves her, and becomes more hopeful. Her feelings of loss and abandonment are ones many kids will easily identify with and the books outcome will be celebrated.  However, it is the addition of a healthy dose of humor that makes ​Flora and Ulysses a must-read. (Candlewick Press, 2013. ISBN: 9780763660406) Sources Candlewick Press,  Flora and Ulysses press kitKate DiCamillos websiteK.G. Campbell’s website